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The myriad benefits of meaningful, regular sex

Frequent intimacy with one’s partner not only offers physical, emotional and social boosts – there are also flow-on professional benefits, says one sex educator and coach.

The myriad benefits of meaningful, regular sex
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When asked about how and why having meaningful, regular sex improves one’s wellness, Bravi sexology executive Georgia Grace responded: “How much time to do we have? Because there are just so many.”

Speaking recently on The Wellness Daily Show, Ms Grace said that, naturally, anything that is useful or healthy for the individual will “in turn be useful and healthy for them as a professional person because we’re not two distinct or different people”.

“One of the first or the most noticeable is the body flushing with oxytocin and dopamine. So, these neuro chemicals that, we call them the cuddle hormone, that support people in feeling more connected to their own body or to other peoples bodies,” she explained.

“That can be felt for up to an hour after orgasm or a fulfilling or pleasurable sexual experience. So, not only is it having an impact on their own body or the person or people theyre having sex with, but the people that they meet on the street or their coworkers, that sense of connection can support them in connecting with other people who they perhaps arent having sex with.”

It is also a great stress relief, she continued.

“In any activity where you are present or mindful or youre even just breathing or down-regulating, it can be a great stress relief. It can support you in having a better nights sleep, which of course can support that sense of stress relief, too,” she said.

“Its also really important to connect with things that make you feel good. So, often as a society we are so busy, we really do value the busyness of going or of constantly doing, but very rarely do we connect with our own things that make our bodies feel good.”

“So, if youre asking someone how theyve been, its quite common to hear, ‘Ive just been so busy’. Rarely do people say, ‘Yeah, I had a really great long bath last night’, or, ‘I treated myself to an arm tickle’, or something like that.”

Moreover, connecting with things that make your body feel pleasure can support you in the intimacy one experiences, “whether that be by yourself, or with other people who youre having sex with, as well as having, or having fulfilling sex can connect you to your libido”, Ms Grace continued.

“The more sex you have, the more sex you are likely to want to have. And that is what we call the source of life or vitality – someone who can identify with their sexuality and see it as a part of their identity, can be connected to their body, they can be connected to the people around them,” she said.

“So, the more sex you have, the more youre aware of what makes you feel good, the more of what you like or know what you like during sex can support you in knowing about your libido and also working to getting your libido to a level that is useful for you and the people that youre having sex with.”

On the question of how such boosts to holistic health can positively impact upon one’s professional health, she said the things one learns from being open and honest with a partner can be transferrable to the workplace.

“And, if we look at that, even getting a sense of your boundaries and where your boundaries are with your body or what you like or dont like, or your ability to communicate or ask for what you want,” she explained.

“If you can ask for what you want during sex, you can ask for that promotion. Like its not going to be that much trickier than asking for the pleasure that you want to receive.”

To hear Jerome’s full conversation with Georgia Grace, click below:

Jerome Doraisamy

Jerome Doraisamy

Jerome Doraisamy is a senior writer for Lawyers Weekly and Wellness Daily at Momentum Media.

Before joining the team in early 2018, Jerome is admitted as a solicitor in New South Wales and, prior to joining the team in early 2018, he worked in both commercial and governmental legal roles and has worked as a public speaker and consultant to law firms, universities and high schools across the country and internationally. He is also the author of The Wellness Doctrines self-help book series and is an adjunct lecturer at The University of Western Australia.

Jerome graduated from the University of Technology, Sydney with a Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Arts in Communication (Social Inquiry).

You can email Jerome at: [email protected] 

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