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Have you lost your mojo?

Attracting good things and good people to you can only happen when you learn to tap into your mojo, writes Sam Makhoul.

Your mojo is more important than you think. It’s more important than what you say and do. It's an invisible force that cannot be explained, only witnessed. We are all born with it but lose it on the way to adulthood.

We may experience glimpses of it here and there by accident, but it is illusive and vanishes quickly. Finding and hanging on to your mojo happens when your physical, psychological and emotional energies are aligned.

Here's how you align them:

1. Keep a ‘hero’ file (emotional)

Treasure and file away all the cool stuff people say about you. Whether it’s an outstanding school report, a testimonial from a client or a beautifully written card from a friend or partner. We all indulge in negative self-talk. A hero file helps you snap out of it.

2. Go fearless (psychological)

In sport and in business, if you start batting on the back foot, you will stop scoring runs and eventually be bowled out. You are most successful when you work like you have nothing to lose. How do you do that? Build up enough savings that can help you get through six months of the toughest financial times. Having this safety net gives you a fearless mindset.

3. Get out of your head (psychological and physical)

You will never find your mojo if you are constantly thinking and using your mind as a storage device. Do a daily “brain dump” in your diary. Keep nothing in your head. This will help you sleep better and get you into the zone of creativity. The other thing you can do is exercise and meditate. Both these activities get you to focus on your breath and therefore on your body.

4. It’s NOT about money (emotional)

Never ever make your life about making money and material things. Your primary purpose as a human being is to serve and inspire others. Your customers, your colleagues, your friends, your family… How do you do that? Listen more emphatically and give more than expected. Your mojo lives in that space called compassion.

5. Go green inside and out (physical and emotional)

The colour green on your eyes lowers blood pressure and dissipates stress. Walk in the park daily. Go for a hike on weekends. Surround yourself with plants at home. (Book: Plant Style by Alana Langan). Drink green smoothies and eat at least two green salads daily. Besides being healthy, plant foods are full of life force that give you that attractive glow.

6. Look your best (physical and psychological)

How you look impacts the way you feel. When you dress and look your best, you will simply feel more confident and “with it”. (Caution: You cannot eat like crap and cover it up with clothes and make-up. You still need to eat clean and stay lean). Choose clothes that are true to your personality. Stay away from fads. Get a style coach. Read Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti. And, Off the Cuff: The Guys’ Guide to Looking Good by Carson Kressley.

7. Don’t stress about stress (psychological)

External stress is everywhere. It only affects your mojo when it consumes you. Some people live through war and take it in stride. Others go into melt down when someone cuts them off on the road. Seriously? Stop trying to make your external surroundings perfect. Stop putting high demands on yourself and the people around you. Life will never be 100 per cent your way. Not even 50 per cent.

“The people who walk around with their mojo intact are the ones who accept that external discomforts are a part of living and that the only people not stressed are dead.”

8. You gotta have fun (emotional)

When we were children, our whole existence was about exploring and having fun. Consequently, our creativity was limitless. The few that carry this fun and playfulness into adult life went on to invent and create the most amazing of human discoveries. Albert Einstein, Leonardo Da Vinci, to name a couple. So my advice is to stop feeling guilty whenever you get the urge to do nothing, or day dream or hang out with friends. Have fun whenever you get the chance. Your mojo loves to have fun.

9. Savour your food (physical and emotional)

Your appetite for food parallels your appetite for life. Food that is full of flavour not only nourishes the body but brings passion to the surface. They call it “soul food” for a reason. Enjoy the variety of foods out there but try and eat true to your cultural heritage.

There is nothing more satisfying than eating food that your parents and grandparents cooked. Savour what you eat slowly, focusing on the smells, texture, colour and taste. Eat outdoors, eat with your hands, eat with friends and, above all, please do NOT eat in front of the TV.

10. Change your environment, often (psychological)

New route, new destination, new friends, new experiences. These all keep your five senses engaged. When you do the same thing every day, your senses become dull. Parts of your brain consequently shut down. Scientists are now realising that Alzheimer’s and dementia is a simple case of “use it or lose it” (Google “The Nun Study”).

New perspectives, new sights, new smells, new flavours, all keep your brain firing and your mojo dancing. There is a difference between being alive and living...

If you want to learn how to get your mojo back, you can join Sam and a lineup of 10 leading global experts at Upgrade Your Life 2019, January 18-20 at The Hyatt Regency in Sydney Australia. Tickets are limited to 200 people and 70 per cent of the ticket allocation has been sold already, so - as Sam says - "do not defer or procrastinate and make the decision that you’ll look back on as the single most important decision in your life."

"Honestly, the way I look at it, being in the room with these amazing speakers is actually priceless and is an investment that you’ll make back MANY times over... snap up one of the remaining seats here before they’re all gone. Take action and live the life we both know you deserve." 

RECENT COMMENTS

Love this .. I grow my own veggies and fruit, they taste better when in season locally
Jules 24 days ago
Thanks, Sophie -- some good life advice in your article!
Peter Eedy 42 days ago
Hey Sophia, I’m the dad of a 12 year old rugby player, Molly has been playing for 4 years. Great insight into the thought process of a young woman and I’m hoping the benefits she’ll get over time.
Paul Bunker 44 days ago